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July 1, 1863



3:30am

Near Emmitsburg, Maryland.  12 miles south of Gettysburg.
Union General, Eleventh Corps commander, Oliver O. Howard
      shaken from damp sleep
  to half consciousness.
         He was handed marching orders by
                an aide on General Meade’s staff.
   Reads them, 
         or does not. 
                     Too early for this German.
   Promptly falls back to sleep.


4:30am

Moritz Tavern, South of Greenmont, Pennsylvania. 7 miles south of Gettysburg.
Dawn also came early for John Reynolds.
    Wing commander, First Corps General
           austerely sleeping on the wooden tavern floor
   as discovered by his aide, 
       like ants crawling around this morning.
Returning from General Meade’s Headquarters:
         Marching orders, like morning ritual.
    Where today?


Reynold’s Wing
        -First Corps to Gettysburg
	-Eleventh Corps to Gettysburg
                      or “supporting distance”
	-Third Corps to Emmitsburg

  He could work out the details as needed
        in the long day ahead.


Cashtown, Pennsylvania.  9 miles west of Gettysburg.
Half-hour before dawn
      sacred time
  the world is asleep
      but somehow everything is alive.
 The blackest sky before sunrise
            yet another light illuminates

Confederate General Henry Heth, a division commander of Hill’s Corps, 
      eager, anxious for Gettysburg
                 anxious to “feel the enemy”
 woke with specific orders from Lee
      to report back if he should  wander across
   anything bigger than militia
         or cavalry
  but not infantry

“do not force an engagement.” 

    It was clear:  no battle today

The rest of Hill’s Corps was a few miles back along the Chambersburg Pike
Ewell’s Corps was to the north
Longstreet’s miles away, behind Heth
     Stuart’s dashing cavalry God knows where

Even though Heth’s hands were obviously tied, 
       today was important.
   Shoes, mostly
           horses, provisions
  and high holy food
 much more scarce here than in Virginia.

All in Gettysburg
       like Canaan to these
   two year worn and barefooted Israelites.

                      ____________________
                                

Pettigrew’s Brigade, also of Heth’s Division of Hill’s Corps,
     lay bivouacked five miles west of Gettysburg
  Sleepy pickets like feelers extended, 
          campfires like a million demon eyes


5:00am 

(a little later)
Heth’s Division, in traditional hurry up and wait fashion
      started off late.
  East on Chambersburg Pike towards 
           dimly misted peeking sunrise.

Leading the newly formed, yet lovingly familiar brown and gray column
        were Pegram’s Five Batteries 
                     (twenty guns, 400 men)
   swiftly followed by Archer’s 1,200 from Tennessee and Alabama, 
       three regiments of Davis’ Brigade, 
               1,700 from Mississippi and North Carolina.
There were deeply Southern men.  


5:30am

General John Buford’s Union Cavalry Division was arrayed in a semi-circle
      around the northern and western outskirts of Gettysburg.
  To the north, they waited for Ewell.
  To the west, the skirmishers and pickets posted west of town, 
         near Marsh Creek were lying in wait to receive
     the nearly unaware men of Heth’s Division.


Geography
To the west of Gettysburg, five ridges rise from the rolling fields.
    
McPhearsons Ridge, closest to the town, and now
         headquarters for Buford and his cavalry
     was the largest and best defendable of the five.  
  A creek named Willoughby Run 
          separated this ridge from Herr Ridge.
    Hardly discernable from the former, 
            was Belmont School House Ridge, 
        rising just westerly.
  Whistler’s Ridge follows after a gulf of gentler swells.
      Finally, Lohr Ridge rises just beyond Marsh Creek.

From McPhearsons Ridge, these features are plainly seen.


Tree line between Chambersburg Pike and Mummasburg Road
A picket from the 6th New York Cavalry
     posted for hours now
         even rusty coffee couldn’t keep away
   damned jittery images

  
    Something was coming.  
              What?
           A gray form?
           Fog?  Mist?
       An animal?
   
          Dear God,   a reb!

He leveled his rifle at this shifting mass, 
         aimed, as best he could.
   Fired.
	Did it fall?
	Dissipate?
  Die?
             Maybe he rubbed his eyes.
      Undoubtedly he cursed.
	Dreaming?

He had fired at nothing.


Three miles north of Gettysburg
Major Anderson’s detachment of the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry
     were posted on the Carlisle Road
 Unlike his comrade from the 6th New York
                they waited until these gray
      possible forms took true shapes.
There were men.

Skirmishers of Ewell’s Corps
        advancing south towards them
    
Here they come.

Anderson’s men did not fire.
     Instead, they fell back two miles
              and called for support, 
    also sent word to headquarters.

They were quickly joined by reserves who took cover
           behind a stonewall.


Fifteen minutes later
Rebel skirmishers approached the 
       left flank and front.
  Men from the 6th and 9th New York Cavalry
    joined them.

The Rebs were held up at the Hoffman and Forney Farms
         on both sides of the Mummasburg Road.
  At the Forney Farm, Union men from the 9th New York
     with but a few shots
             drove the enemy from their front.
This Union detachment then withdrew
     returning to their squadron.


6:00am

Chambersburg Pike
  The 13th Alabama of Archer’s Brigade, now five miles
           from Gettysburg, halted.
 The color bearer, 
                 until now, unexpectant of action,
     was ordered to uncase the colors
            in the misty rain.


                      ____________________
                                
                                
                                
As Brockenbrough’s Brigade, nearly 1,000 strong, all Virginians
       was finally leaving Cashtown,
  Pettigrew’s Brigade of 2,500 North Carolinians
                 fell in behind
    Davis’s Brigade on the Chambersburg Pike.
  Now more than doubling the number of
           Confederates marching towards Gettysburg.


Moritz Tavern
General John Buford,
      seven miles away from his command
Met personally with John Reynolds, 
                no time for aide de camps
   Reported the closeness of the enemy on all fronts.
The infantry must come up.


                      ____________________
                                


Still behind their stonewall, near the Mummasburg Road
           just northwest of town
   Captain Hanley’s detachment of the 9th New York Cavalry
                         heard gentle rustling  coming from 
        the wheatfield to their front.
   Now closer.

Gray men squiggling, hardly graceful, bellies to the ground.
    Crawling through the wheat to surprise them.
Private Cornish, of the 9th, made sure the rolls would reverse.
           He waited, like the rest of them men
                    in his detachment.
    But when the moment took him, 
               he fired one shot
      killing a southerner.

 This sent the remaining Confederate infantry men
           scrambling up from the ground
      and high-tailing it in retreat.
  One, who was caught resting by a tree, breathless
              unable to run another yard
      was taken prisoner.
  For him, the battle was over
                before it began.


                      ____________________
                                
                                
                                
For the Union Pickets on Whistler’s Ridge, along the Chambersburg Pike
           six am was their Changing of the Guards
    Two privates, who, all night
                    stared at the burning fires of Pettigrew’s camp
        just two miles to their front, 
                were replaced by two fresh privates
 still shaking sleep from their eyes, 
                       praying
               for clear minds
               for clear fields ahead


Idle chatter, or maybe none at all
          simply two horse soldiers
               westerly looking 
   beautiful wide rolling hills
           like green and golden ripples
 lapping onto the shores of deep
                 Blue Ridge Mountains.

 They were out there somewhere
   maybe breaking camp
   maybe marching
   maybe coming here
               coming now
      to kill
                     all screams and 
                 bloody hell opening up

Two pickets from the 8th Illinois Cavalry
        standing
               waiting
   now, with the rising sun to their backs
           maybe daydreaming:
	    Home
              Loved ones
   quiet now
 
  Minutes crawling by
            ten of them
      until a small plumb of dust
                    rising, miles off
   miles down the Chambersburg Pike
            something is coming
Men.
      To see a dust cloud this far away, 
    a lot of men.

The two pickets, now entertained
              just watched.
   They simply watched the small column of dust
         grow in size, 
      draw closer
                  traveling with the Road 
  Slowly.  Creeping.
     Even slinking towards these two waiting men.
    Watching.


                      ____________________
                                
                                
                                
6:30am

Corporal Cyrus W. Jones, 9th New York Cavalry was killed
as Company G filled a gap in the line north of Gettysburg.


7:00am

Union First Corps receives its marching orders
Wadsworth’s Division to be first
        to move out of Greenmont
   
 Just as 
          Buford was returning to his command.
   He was informed of some Rebel forces
       moving towards them on the Chambersburg Pike.
           He ascended the Seminary Copula 
   for a clearer look.


                      ____________________
                                
                                
For nearly an hour the pickets from the 8th Illinois
       watched the dust rising from the Chambersburg Pike.
   Dotting and accenting this plumb, 
                 dimly colored specks
          became flags unfurled
                 grey splotches
          became men.

Normal procedure would have been to alert
         Sergeant Shaffer, who was in charge 
   of the pickets in this area.
        But Shaffer was not to be found.

 Lieutenant Marcellous Jones, next on the ladder
         was sought and alerted.
  Minutes now no longer crawled
         All time was swiftly slipping away.
In ten minutes, Jones arrived. 
           It could not have taken
    more than his quick glance
                 to determine what was
        waiting for them
 
Not waiting, but
         coming for them.

Jones’ Company E quickly followed
       and as they formed into a defensive
 skirmish line, 
              one soldier shouted the often heard, 
          seemingly rehearsed 
  (though, what else can be said?)
           “There They Come!”
He raised his carbine to fire.
         
Lieutenant Jones dismounted, 
          perhaps realizing the importance, 
   the gravity of things to come, 
                    calling for the gunman to “hold on.”
He walked to Sergeant Shaffer, who handed him his
         carbine

“Give me the honor of opening this battle.”
Then steadied the gun on a nearby
           rail fence
    beside the Marsh Creek Bridge,
 found a target mounted on horseback
                800 yards distant.


7:30am

He fired.
      Missed.


7:45am

Near Heidlersburg, Pennsylvania
Rodes’ Confederate Division of 7,500 men
           begin their march to Gettysburg
     Ten miles south



                      ____________________
                                
                                
Archer’s Division formed their skirmish line
          along Marsh Creek
   mere yards to the front of Marcellous Jones’ Company E.
    Behind this gray line, below the crest of Lohr Ridge
         Marye’s Battery of
      Pegram’s Artillery fired one round towards Company E, 
 formed near a blacksmith’s shop on Whislers Ridge.
  
The projectile exploded in mid-air
        and the yankees clung to the ground 
   for cover.
 The shot was followed by several others
              
This, now fated, blacksmith’s shop was owned by
          Ephram Whisler, an older gentleman, 
   who, with his curiosity getting the best of him
                  decided to investigate.
 More than poking his gray head
          out from some gopher hole of a window.
     He sauntered out on the Chambersburg Pike 
    in front of his house.

Just as
    a solid shot from Marye’s Battery 
                hit the road a few feet in front of him, 
        ploughing a messy furrow
           scattering dust and dirt and 
   some horrifying noise
                        all over the old man
   who then, with terror engulfing him wholly, 
             returned to his bed
       never rising from it again.


                     ____________________ 

8:00am

The First and Eleventh Corps of the Union Army Begin Their
             March Towards Gettysburg

First Corps:
          -Wadsworth’s 1st Division, 3,400 men, 
                    from Greenmont, via the Emmitsburg Road.
          -Robinson’s 2nd Division, 3,000 men, 
                    from north of Emmitsburg, via the Emmitsburg Road.
          -Rowley’s 3rd Division, 2,700 men (Stannard’s Brigade stayed behind), 
                    was spread out.
                       Biddle’s and Stone’s Brigades encamped the night before
             between Bull Frog Road and Marsh Creek, south east of Gettysburg, 
                         guarding the roads around Fairfield, 
                        just in case.
                      (Rumor had it that 6,000 Rebs were wandering 
                              around those parts.  Nothing of the sort.)
                These two brigades would continue on Bull Frog Road
                  until it met up with a smaller road crossing Sach’s Bridge.
                    They then would connect with the Fairfield Road, 
                                providing some protection to the left flank
                       of the columns marching up the Emmitsburg Road.
It would be an hour until every man in every division got moving.

Eleventh Corps:
         From the east of Emmitsburg, following the First Corps.
                  They would later choose an alternate route
         as to not be held up on the on the already clogged
                               Emmitsburg Road.
  The marching order was:
          -Barlow’s Division, 2,400 men
          -Schurz’s Division, 3,000 men
          -Von Steinwehr’s Division, 2,800


                      ____________________
                                
General Pender’s Confederate  Division of
             Hill’s Corps, 6,300 men, who camped just
        west of Cashtown,
                   had formed up
       and were now on their way to Gettysburg


                      ____________________
                                
                                
Heth’s thin line of skirmishers, 
           formed now for fifteen minutes, 
     step off
                      scouting
        feeling towards
                  Jones’ Company E and the
          rest of the Union Cavalry.

    Archer’s and Davis’s main bodies were still waiting
           in columns on the Chambersburg Pike

It did not take long for Lt. Jones to call 
             for Reenforcements. 
   How could he even think about holding otherwise?
Captain Dana was asked to bring up the other company
          in the squadron.


8:15am

Captain Dana arrives with 100 men
          with nearly a quarter of that number
           left to hold the horses
                                there were all cavalry men fighting
                                as infantry

   They formed a thin skirmish line a little behind
         Jones’ position on Whisler’s Ridge
      taking shelter of a rail fence with 10 yard
                       intervals between each new man.
   And now they waited.


                      ____________________
                                

In the woods just to their front
        the brigades of Archer and Davis were
  forming into line of battle. 
             Archer taking the south side of the road
             Davis, the north.

The Rebel skirmishers, now within range
               begin to fire
    random shots
                    here and there
       mostly to say “we’re here.”

The Union Cavalry soldiers returned their message, 
            though not as generously.


8:30am

Dim figures to the morning eyes
            Corporal Hodges of the 9th New York Cavalry. 
   He was posted on the east bank of Willoughby Run
                   near a railroad bed on the northern side of
         the Chambersburg Pike
  Rebs coming here too?
             or returning Union patrols?
    Better send word anyway.
                  to all of Devin’s pickets and picket reserves 

  Hodges himself rode to Herr Ridge
               following the Chambersburg Pike.
       Closer.
                  Clear now.   Rebels.
    
    A few bullets whizzed by his head
              he turned his mount around
         and retraced his steps, faster now. 
   Crossed the bridge at Willoughby Run, 
                 dismounted and grabbed a carbine
        fired several shots in anger,
              kneeling behind the bridge
  
Rebs were all over the place now 
         so difficult to tell what
       was coming at you 
               or what was going on about you, 
  even 500 yards off.

Across the pike from Corporal Hodges, 
              also out of site, and somehow out 
        of conscious remembered earshot
  the oncoming Rebel skirmishers out-numbered
             Captain Dana’s 100 men, 
      compelling them to fall back several
                       hundred yards
          firing at will.


                      ____________________
                                
Colonels Gamble and Devin, with the bulk of
              their men 
     form defensive lines on the
         western slope of
       McPherson’s Ridge.
                 Their skirmishers advancing towards
             Willoughby Run.
There was no digging in.
        Take shelter behind what you’ve got now
   Soon they will come booming.
  Nothing to stop them now.


8:45am

This new defensive line, waiting
        assured that “they” were indeed coming.
  As Major John Beveridge of the 8th Illinois Cavalry
            was joined by another squadron, 
       he sent men to inform all in this line, 
   all of Buford’s Division. 
The time has come.


                      ___________________
                                
The advance pickets of Devin’s Brigade were
          still falling back. 
    A squadron of the 6th New York
            narrowly escaped capture
      enveloped and realizing nearly too late.
 In short and ingloriously, 
                 they ran for it.


                      ____________________
                                
This gray Rebel skirmish line advance towards
         Belmont Schoolhouse Ridge,
    ascended and rested upon reaching the top

Two 3" rifled guns of Marye’s Battery were rushed forward
            to Herr Ridge, 
        firing a few shots into the woods
                 on McPherson’s Ridge. 
    They were not provided with a Union reply.
  
 The skirmishers then resumed their sluggish
                    march towards Herr Ridge
                    towards the enemy.
						
                                
                      ____________________
                                
Lt. John Calef’s Union Battery was
         unlimbering their guns
      as shots, though scarce, 
           exploded nearby
All six guns in battery
              along side the Chambersburg Pike.
   But did not return fire.


8:55am

Reaching the top of Herr Ridge, Heth’s skirmishers
         halted at its crest.
   Archer’s Brigade followed, 
                halting behind the skirmishers.


9:00am

Calef rode over to meet with General Buford. 
     He wanted this to begin.    
   But Buford wanted the guns placed, not together,
         but scattered
      to make six guns appear  
      to be more than six guns.

Two were placed on the north side of the pike.
Two on the south side, 
            Both on McPherson’s Ridge.
The last two, 
          comprising the left section,
   were placed near Herbst’s Woods
       500 yards south of the Chambersburg Pike.

 In short order, 
      Calef picked up and began to move
             to his new position.


                      ____________________
                                
Seeing Archer at rest, 
        Heth ordered him forward.
   But Davis’ Brigade had not yet
      reached Herr Ridge.
What was ahead today?

How can one brigade
         especially as small as Archer’s
    simply wander by its lonesome 
        into that unknown?
Archer would not move in unsupported.

If we cannot have infantry, then we shall have artillery.
    Seventeen of Pegram’s guns were now
   placed in scattered positions between
          Belmont Schoolhouse Ridge and Herr Ridge.
      Ordered to fire.
  Now they were whaling away.       


                      ____________________
                                
Reynolds receives Buford’s courier message:
          Rebs coming down Chambersburg Pike.
      Sends word to Meade and Howard
                to Wadsworth. 
   Hurry.

 Also sends Hall’s Battery B of Maine
             to get between the Rebs and Gettysburg
    and throw a few shells.


9:05am

Reynolds leaves his advancing columns to meet with Buford 
          near McPherson’s Hill.


9:10am

Davis was now abreast with Archer’s Brigades, 
          both still in column.
  No longer singular, 
              Archer ordered his brigade
    up over the crest of Herr Ridge,
                  swinging south 
         to deploy in line of battle. 
  While Davis, with no chance to rest,
            continued forward, 
       edging north, 
                rushing into line.

3,000 Confederates were now aligning themselves
        for action, 
                though mostly hidden from Union view.
  And waited.


                      ____________________
                                
Buford’s pickets were now falling back to Willoughby Run, 
        just at the wester slope of McPherson’s Ridge.
   Behind them, Calef’s guns.

With his battery now in its new position, 
        Calef was observing his left section
      near Herbst Woods.
 Around him
           around them all
                        the sounds of skirmishing
                        the sounds of Pegram’s guns
                                whaling 
  It grew on him.  Almost to the back of his mind.
           Like the chirping of birds
                   or water in a stream.

But one blast
            from the right
        caught him by surprise.
   A gun fired.   One of his guns.
      From his right section.
No order had been given to fire.

Today Lt. John Rider, gunner of a piece 
          in Calef’s right section
   took matters into
         his own hands
  As  Davis’ Brigade was coming over
       Herr Ridge, he saw an opportunity.
   Why not shoot?
Unable to stomach that irresistible urge,
          he ordered his gun to fire.

Calef, now introduced to the spirit of his boys
     ordered all guns to fire.

Pegram’s Confederate guns, now with something to 
               focus their fire upon
     took aim at Calef’s battery.

For nearly thirty minutes this lop-sided 
        affair played out.
  Calef over shooting, 
                     but landing his shots among
      Pettigrew’s Brigade
  now coming up Herr Ridge
        still behind Pegram’s Battery lines. 


9:10am

Davis was now abreast with Archer’s Brigades, 
          both still in column.
  No longer singular, 
              Archer ordered his brigade
    up over the crest of Herr Ridge,
                  swinging south 
         to deploy in line of battle. 
  While Davis, with no chance to rest,
            continued forward, 
       edging north, 
                rushing into line.

3,000 Confederates were now aligning themselves
        for action, 
                though mostly hidden from Union view.
  And waited.


                      ____________________
                                
Buford’s pickets were now falling back to Willoughby Run, 
        just at the wester slope of McPherson’s Ridge.
   Behind them, Calef’s guns.

With his battery now in its new position, 
        Calef was observing his left section
      near Herbst Woods.
 Around him
           around them all
                        the sounds of skirmishing
                        the sounds of Pegram’s guns
                                whaling 
  It grew on him.  Almost to the back of his mind.
           Like the chirping of birds
                   or water in a stream.

But one blast
            from the right
        caught him by surprise.
   A gun fired.   One of his guns.
      From his right section.
No order had been given to fire.

Today Lt. John Rider, gunner of a piece 
          in Calef’s right section
   took matters into
         his own hands
  As  Davis’ Brigade was coming over
       Herr Ridge, he saw an opportunity.
   Why not shoot?
Unable to stomach that irresistible urge,
          he ordered his gun to fire.

Calef, now introduced to the spirit of his boys
     ordered all guns to fire.

Pegram’s Confederate guns, now with something to 
               focus their fire upon
     took aim at Calef’s battery.

For nearly thirty minutes this lop-sided 
        affair played out.
  Calef over shooting, 
                     but landing his shots among
      Pettigrew’s Brigade
  now coming up Herr Ridge
        still behind Pegram’s Battery lines. 


9:15am

Lt. Jerome, in the cupola of the Seminary, 
      spots General Reynolds and a 
               column of blue infantry
          one mile off.
 
  Sends word to Buford, 
               who, without delay
      joins Jerome,
   borrowing his field glasses. 

Reynolds is coming.
          Thank God.
“Now we can hold this place.”

He followed Reynolds with his eyes
             overjoyed, 
      but work ahead.

 Until within earshot, 
    Reynolds the first to call out, understating
           “What’s the matter, John?”

Buford calmly returns
   “The devil’s to pay.”

And descends to meet Reynolds


9:25am

Major E. P. Holstead of Doubleday’s First Corps staff
             rode to meet up with Reynolds near the Seminary:

   Return word to Doubleday, 
                     Hurry your men.

The youngest on Reynolds staff was Captain Weld.
     Stephen.
                         To General Meade:
    The enemy is advancing in strong force.
         “I will fight him inch by inch, 
           and if driven into town
                      I will barricade the streets.”


9:30am

Under heavy enemy artillery fire, 
       Buford and Reynolds rode to
                    the defensive line
       to observe,
               learn the situation.


                      ____________________
                                
Pegram’s Rebel Artillery ceased fire
              allowing Archer and Davis to 
       advance their brigades.


                      ____________________
                                
The First Corps by now, 
            in their advance towards the action
        could hear artillery booming to their left.

General Cutler halted to wait for Meredith’s Iron Brigade
              as they lagged behind.
   To catch up in good order, 
                    a “quick-step” was ordered.

  Here, they 6th Wisconsin of Meredith’s Brigade 
          uncased their colors
              to a brass band playing
   “The campbells are coming.”


                      ____________________
                                
Enter:  the Hero
He carried an ancient flint lock, smoothbore from a
           forgotten time. 
     His black silk hat, slightly tattered, 
              but presentable.
  Gruff and intent.

   His name was John Burns.
          Gettysburg constable.

 Elderly, superstitious, and ready for a brawl. 
       He was a veteran of the War of 1812, 
                the Seminole Wars
     and tried to fight in the Mexican War, 
             but was rejected:
                                  too old.

Now, in his late 60's, he might not get this chance again.
          Earlier in the morning, he grabbed his old relic
       off the gun rack. 
  He was obviously itching for some action.

His wife, understandably worried, questioned
              what in the devil did he think he was doing?
   You’re an old man, John.  Not now.

“The boys might need this.”
              Maybe lovingly patting his old friend.

He left his house and now stood beside
           Major E. P. Holstead, not five minutes into his
      journey to report ot General Doubleday.
To Burns, this could be his ticket in.  

He need know only two things:
    “Which was are the Rebels?”
    “Where are our troops?”

Holstead was dumbstruck.
             Who was this antique of a man?
   Some local too big for his britches.
          Burns sensed his thoughts.
Determination overcame him.  
    In his eyes, he was a warrior.

“I have fit before.”
              and walked towards the front lines
          to fit again.


9:35am

With infantry out of danger of friendly fire, 
        Pegram’s artillery opened up once more.
  Archer’s and Davis’ main bodies, 
         were only 150 yards away from where Buford’s skirmishers
       were recently posted along Willoughby Run.

They now rejoined their units.


                      ____________________
                                
One of Calif’s guns had been hit
             in the second volley from Pegram.
  The axil was split, 
           the gun unoperational. 


                      ____________________

Codori fields east of the farm
The 76th New York of Cutler’s Brigade, as they waited for
       the boys of Meredith’s Brigade to hurry on
   could not help but develop a healthy lusting
              for the cherries, ripe for picking.

The men were under strict orders not to harm any
              of the farmers’ property.
   They knew this
           as did their commander, Major Grover.

He spoke to his men, in a lecturer’s voice. 
         Short. Simple.
  We are under orders to harm no property. 
      When you pick the cherries, be mindful not
             to harm any of the good farmer’s trees.
  And then turned his back.


                      ____________________

General Reynolds and Buford
         stood near the middle section of
     Calif’s Battery
                on the south edge of the Chambersburg Pike.
   Surveying. 
      Reynolds sent a dispatch to General Howard
  to bring up his Eleventh Corps to the southern outskirts
            of town and wait for orders.


9:40am

After Reynolds left the front lines to hurry his own men along, 
         Buford rode  up and down Gamble’s defensive line
     to offer encouragement for the engagement
              now picking up.

Archer’s skirmishers, still on the other side of
        Willoughby Run
   Hammered away at Gambles men, holding to their
               position.		
    Hold now.

 The smoke building until neither side could see the other.
    Now just firing at the red-orange flashed
         of the enemy’s rifles.
 But no rebel yell. 
         No charge. 
   Just stand and take it. 
            Give it. 
  And hold.  Please hold.


9:45am

Near Codori Farm, Emmitsburg Road
One mile south of Gettysburg	
General Meredith’s First Corps brigade, quick-stepping, 
      catches up with Cutler’s Brigade near
                    the Codori Farm.

They are ordered to halt
     as their commander, General Wadsworth
  peers across fields to the northwest
          towards the now audible battle.
     towards where John Reynolds
             must surely be coming.

As he strained his eyes across orchards and meadows, 
         he saw a kicking up of dust. 
  Thinking it must be Reynolds, 
   He rode out to meet him.

It was indeed John Reynolds coming at a fast trot. 
      Orders:

   Cutler’s Brigade must leave this road, 
         move across these fields to their left, 
      cross Fairfield Road and halt near
               the Chambersburg Pike.
			
Hall’s Battery, which for some reason never left
           for the front as ordered,
     to fall in behind Cutler.

Meredith to follow.
 
        All at the double-quick.
   Run.
Reynolds will meet them there.


                      ____________________
                                
A handful of Union skirmishers were still clinging to 
         a portion of Herr Ridge, north of the Chambersburg Pike.
  Men of the 12th Illinois and 3rd Indiana
             under the command of Major Lemon.

First it was against Davis’ sharpshooters.
        Cavalry skirmishers up against sharpshooters
      didn’t stand much of a chance.
  But now it was the entire battle line of Davis’ Brigade.
                What chance could they have?
    Now it was time to move.

As they left Herr Ridge behind them, 
                 they left Major Lemon as well.
   He and sixteen others fell dead
                          or mortally wounded. 

The ridge was now clear of Yankees.


10:00am

It did not take long for Davis to move his brigade
          over Herr Ridge once the Union skirmishers
   were cleared out.

Archer, on the other side of the pike, had crossed Willoughby Run
      and pushed Gamble’s line back 200 yards until
   they were now in line with Calif’s guns.

Devin, just now meeting Davis, held his ground.
    But all of the cavalry was nearly out of ammunition.
  As was Calef.
How long could they hold now?






 
                 


       









 

     
 

	
				


                                










 

     
 

	
				










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